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Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

2 edition of Can capital markets create incentives for pollution control? found in the catalog.

Can capital markets create incentives for pollution control?

Paul Lanoie

Can capital markets create incentives for pollution control?

by Paul Lanoie

  • 77 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by World Bank, Policy Research Dept., Environment, Infrastructure, and Agriculture Division in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Environmental protection.,
  • Capital market.,
  • Factory and trade waste -- Environmental aspects.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Paul Lanoie, Benoît Laplante, Maité Roy.
    SeriesPolicy research working paper ;, 1753, Policy research working papers ;, 1753.
    ContributionsLaplante, Benoît, 1960-, Roy, Maité., World Bank. Policy Research Dept. Environment, Infrastructure, and Agriculture Division.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHG3881.5.W57 P63 no. 1753
    The Physical Object
    Pagination28 p. :
    Number of Pages28
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL415453M
    LC Control Number98118545

    Policy Options for Environmental Pollution Control, Roth Page 1 1. INTRODUCTION It can be assumed that some level of government intervention to meet environmental and welfare needs of society is desirable. The question is, then, to determine what level of File Size: KB. As pollution is made expensive relative to pollution control, more pollution abatement will be selected by the cost-minimizing entrepreneur. Thus, the greater the degree of pollution abatement desired, the higher the tax or penalty rate should be in order to provide the desired incentives.

    To create a market supply schedule, an economist needs to know the total output of all suppliers in a given market Greater output. Negative effect of a firm's limited capital: Diminishing marginal returns. Curve pattern for marginal product of labor when capital is limited: Requiring pollution control on automobiles exemplifies. Government’s role in markets Government can affect markets either through direct participation (as a market maker or as a buyer or supplier of goods and services), or through indirect participation in private markets (for example, through regulation, taxation, subsidy or other influence). Government frequently has a choice betweenFile Size: KB.

    Economic Instruments for Pollution Control and Prevention – A Brief Overview 3 One final weakness of existing regulations is that they have focused on large point sources, both because these were obvious first targets, but also to minimise the information, monitoring and measurement burdens on regulators.   Ted Gayer steps back from the particulars of the recent climate-change debate to consider cap-and-trade models and the broader problem of how best to reduce environmental degradation from a market Author: Ted Gayer.


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Can capital markets create incentives for pollution control? by Paul Lanoie Download PDF EPUB FB2

This paper - a product of the Environment, Infrastructure, and Agriculture Division, Policy Research Department - is part of a larger effort in the department's ongoing work on industrial pollution and also to study whether capital markets in developing countries can.

To improve incentives for pollution control, regulators have recently embarked on a strategy to release information to communities and markets (investors and consumers) about firms'environmental performance.

Drawing on evidence from American and Canadian studies, the authors report that capital markets do react to the release of such information. Get this from a library. Can capital markets create incentives for pollution control?.

[Paul Lanoie; Benoît Laplante; Maité Roy; World Bank. Policy Research Department. Environment, Infrastructure, and Agriculture Division.] -- Private firms reluctant to invest in pollution abatement when the penalty for noncompliance falls short of the cost of abatement may be more willing to invest in.

in developing countries can provide the incentives needed for pollution control. The study was funded by the Bank's Research Support Budget under the research project "Incentives for Pollution Control in Developing Can capital markets create incentives for pollution control? book The Role of Capital Markets" (RPO ).

Copies of this paper are available free from the World Bank, H Street NW. In particular, current research will indicate whether or not capital markets in developing countries can create incentives for pollution control. Further research should also indicate whether or not this information not only has an impact on market valuation, but ultimately whether or not it affects a polluter's environmental by: Get this from a library.

Can capital markets create incentives for pollution control?. [Paul Lanoie; Benoît Laplante; Maité Roy; World Bank. Policy Research Department. Environment, Infrastructure, and Agriculture Division.].

Regulators have recently embarked on a deliberate strategy to release information to markets (investors and consumers) regarding firms' environmental performance in order to enhance incentives for pollution control. In this paper, we analyze the role that capital markets may play to create such incentives.

We thus provide insights on the relative impact of the traditional (fines and penalties) and emerging (public disclosure) enforcement strategies. We present evidence that the public disclosure of environmental performance does create additional and strong incentives for pollution by: State-level pollution control tax credits and incentives Many states offer qualifying businesses one or more types of incentives to invest in pollution control equipment and mitigation activity.

The format of the incentive may differ depending on the state and the focus of its tax code. Emissions trading (also known as cap and trade) is a market-based approach to controlling pollution by providing economic incentives for reducing the emissions of pollutants. A central authority (usually a governmental body) allocates or sells a limited number of permits to discharge specific quantities of a specific pollutant per time period.

Polluters are required to hold permits in amount. INCENTIVES FOR POLLUTION CONTROL 2 1 pollution, D = D(x), D'(x) > 0, D"(x) > 0. BARGAINING UNDER PERFECT INFORMATION. Suppose in this example that the cost and damage functions are known to both firms, and that ambient pollution is a strictly increasing, convex function of e, x = x(e), which is also known by both firms.

Incentives for pollution control - regulation and public disclosure (English) Abstract. An increasing number of regulators have adopted public disclosure programs to create incentives for pollution control.

Previous empirical analyses of monitoring and enforcement issues have focused strictly on the impact of such traditional practices as Cited by: considered to be pollution control "equipment." Because the definition of pollution as well as what is considered an eligible pollution control investment typically varies from one state to the next, careful analysis is required to differentiate those various state rules and requirements.

State-level pollution control tax credits and incentives. The United States Experience with Economic Incentives for Pollution Control Over the the last 20 years, and particularly during the past decade, economic incentives have been increasingly used to control pollution and improve environmental and health protection.

INCENTIVES TO AIR POLLUTION CONTROL With a system of emission charges, a company might pay a low charge if the damage caused by its emissions were low, and a high charge if the damages were high.

There would be nothing except the economic motivation provided by the incentive scheme to force control of by:   Lanoie P, Laplante B, Roy M () Can capital markets create incentives for pollution control. Ecol Econ 26(1)–41 Google Scholar Malaysia SME () Where is the green money?Author: Azlan Amran, Mehran Nejati, Say Keat Ooi, Faizah Darus.

new techniques for pollution control. The intent of this paper is to indicate a need for caution when making such claims in the realm of pollution control in competitive markets (and perhaps in more general competitive market contexts as well).

We will show that the dynamic superiority of market-based environmental policies over direct controls. Creating incentives to control pollution (English) Abstract.

An innovative program in Indonesia, developed with assistance from the World Bank researches, set out to tap the power of public opinion and financial markets to encourage factories to reduce by: 5.

Requiring that the public receive detailed information, interpreted objectively, can create incentives for business and governments to limit pollution. The amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act, passed by the 94th Congress after two years of acrimony, require local water systems to notify customers once a year about bacteria and.

An economics professor, upset about the rising cost of textbooks, proposed that his department purchase 50 copies of a statistics book so the students in the statistics class would not have to purchase their own books but rather could borrow a book for the semester and then return it for the next class to use.

Subsidies for pollution control are another incentive-based approach. This is defined as financial support granted by the government for activities and products deemed to be environmentally friendly.Capital cost incentives: Because coal plants emit more CO2 per megawatt-hour than gas plants, CCUS retrofits on coal plants require more capital investment dollars up front: 90% capture requires approximately $ million per megawatt for a coal plant and $, per megawatt for a natural gas combined cycle plant.The U.S.

Experience with Economic Incentives to Control Environmental Pollution credits for companies that exceed their requirements (described in Section ). Title II also includes a marketable credit program for certain vehicle fleet operators who exceed requirements for .